German Shepherds from Banffy Haus: Should You Breed Your Dog Once to Keep a Pup?

Hello lovers of German shepherd puppies from Banffy Haus:

Of course we love our German Shepherds.  And  we would love to get another just like our current dog.  But should you breed your pet once to try to replicate your buddy?

I talk to a lot of people who say they would like to have full AKC registration and don’t want to get their dog neutered (male) or spayed (female) until they get a litter from them.  Their idea is that they love this dog so much that they would like to get a son or daughter of their dog to get a dog just like their beloved older dog.  The question is, does this make sense?  Other reasons include to save money or to give pups to relatives.

The short and frank answer is…no.

First of all, likely you have not had the dog’s hip stats done with either AKC or a foreign registry if you got it as a puppy.  It is somewhat irresponsible to breed a dog without knowing for certain that their joints are healthy.

Secondly, if it is a male, you can’t be certain that the male will have enough libido and mate well (get a good tie), have enough sperm concentration or motility.  Also, you don’t know what he will produce in terms of health, temperament, or good confirmation.  You have no history to go by.  Also, likely if you do mate an untitled dog the only person who would mate to yours is another person with an untitled dog.  This can be very risky. Thirdly, you probably are not going to be able to select a dog with compatible bloodlines (good line-breeding) because you won’t have much choice in females.  Also, the chances you will get a dog closely mirroring your current “best friend” is not probable.

If it is a female, then you can spend the money for a stud.  But, not everyone is willing to breed their beautiful titled stud to your untitled pet.  You also don’t know if your female will produce milk, be fertile, be a good mother (tend the pups and not harm them).  You will not be expert in timing the ovulation, and certainly could have trouble with whelping since you are likely very inexperienced.  You could easily lose pups if not all of the them and endanger the female’s life.  It could happen at night and necessitate emergency surgery that could cost a great deal of money.  Then there are the vet bills for puppy inoculations and health checks.

After it is all said and done, it would be better to just pay the price and get another puppy from a top breeding, with experienced breeder, with top lines, with a guarantee.  That new German shephed puppy will likely become another family legend and bring you equally as much joy as your last best friend.

I hope this was helpful.

Please visit our website for tons of information at Banffy Haus K-9 University on German shepherd puppies and dogs.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Should you buy a “monorchid” puppy?

Hello German shepherd puppies lovers:

The question is whether or not you should be concerned with buying a monorchid (one testicle down) male German Shepherd Puppy.

Well let’s consider the facts.  First of all, if you not a very experienced breeder who knows how to choose a potential top stud, and if you are not willing to put in the $4,000-5,000 for training, if you are not willing to shoulder the risk that the puppy may end up with bad hips, bad conformation may not have enough libido, or may be sterile, then you should not buy a puppy with the hope of getting stud or a top show dog.

Second of all, if you are buying the dog as a pet, it is irrelevant.  When buying as a pet one would want to neuter the dog when he gets to the relevant age anyway, at which point he will have neither scrotum. Having them removed has some clear advantages such as less or no sexual behavior, diminished marking and roaming, no chance of testicular cancer, less aggressive behavior, and less embarrassing displays of male body parts.

The neuter operation is a little more expensive when one testicle does not fall, but usually not exorbitantly.  And after the neuter there are absolutely no long-term effects to the dog of having been monorchid.  Nor was any significant risk when the dog was waiting to be neutered.

So should one buy a monorchid male puppy?  If you are buying a pet male, then this should be irrelevant to your decision.

I hope this was helpful.

Homepage at “Banffy Haus German shepherds” to take advantage of the rich information about black and red German shepherd puppies.

 

 

 

Rules on Multiple Dog Houses: Gender? Age?

Hello German shepherd puppies lovers:

One of the most heart-rendering reports I received from a client was about a German shepherd puppy I sold to them.  From what I understand, they had two adult shepherds and a very young puppy (10 weeks or so) and went away from the house.  Somehow the containment area between the adults had been breached and the puppy got in with the adults.  They called me, understandably distraught, and told me they had found the puppy with its neck broken in the adult area of the kennels.  These were good people, responsible people, but somehow a mistake was made.

A second client called me and was beside herself because the adult female she had imported fought everyday with her male, and that much blood had been shed.  She herself could be severely injured in the process of breaking up one of these fights. Supposedly she had followed the rules before making the decision, male with female if adult.  She just couldn’t understand what had happened.

I would like to do a couple of blogs on this issue.  What are the simple basic guidelines for mixing genders and age?  What is the proper age and gender to bring a dog into an already existing pack ?  How do you decrease the problems and how can you determine if there may be a problem?

In this blog I will give you just a couple of basic, general rules for mixing genders and age.  But remember, current pack dynamics, individual dog temperaments, must be analyzed in addition to these simple guidelines.  But here they are.

Probably the ideal is to begin with puppies that are opposite genders, brought in together into a family.  This way they will grow up together, set pack order normally quite well through ritualistic, non-injurious pack order confirmation.  Next, probably would be a puppy (male best, female second) with an adult female, especially if they have been bred or if it is the mother.  This way the maternal instinct with be strong.  Next is probably an older mature male with a female puppy.   Following this might be an adult female with an adult male.  Next, and starting to get into an area that raises potential red flags, would be two male puppies brought up together.  Now we move into the pairing which are clearly risky.  This would include two females or two males.

I will discuss more in the next article.  And clearly there are other variables which can be even more determinate, such as temperament, and expertise of the owner to read the signs and properly socialize them together safely, or how much time they have to spend supervising them when they are together.

I hope this was helpful.

Please visit our current litters at “Banffy Haus Current Litters” to see some of our world class German shepherd litters.

 

 

Coprophagia: Yuk…But we have to address it.

Hello German shepherd puppies lovers:

Well, I would really rather not deal with this issue, but we must.  It is just so objectionable, so gross when we see a German Shepherd puppy do it.  You never want them to lick you again, or breath in your face.  You lose all respect for your best friend as if they intentionally have done this to shame you.

And when you see it you just get grossed out.  It is coprophagia.  And many dogs do it, and that is eating their  _________ .     There can be many causes including:

  1. Hunger, they are not getting enough food (if they are normal weight or fat this is not the problem.
  2. It could be a vitamin deficiency or mal-absorption of nutrients in the dog’s food.
  3. It can be behavioral, scavenging, (for puppies) mimicking mom’s behavior in cleaning up after the puppies.
  4. It can also just be that some stool has enough palatable attributes (flavor, texture, smell) that they are attracted to it (yuk).

How can you change this behavior?  Here are a couple of ideas:

  1. First and foremost, clean up after your dog!
  2. Make certain that they have no access to a yard in which your other dogs relieve themselves.
  3. When walking, be careful to watch them, and use a leash correction if they approach it.
  4. You can purchase a powder which, when mixed with food and they injest it, makes it not attractive to the dog.
  5. A bit of a more drastic approach that I have used is to spray all the poor in the yard with pepper spray.  This experience certainly can be uncomfortable for the dog and make them hesitant to do it again.

But, no matter what, always, always clean up their excrement.  For example, with puppies, take them out at predetermined intervals to relieve themselves, and then pick it up before leaving.  And once you start to treat the behavior it can take a number of months to stop it.

Sorry.  I will stop with this subject now.  But I know there are people out there for whom this might be helpful.

I hope this was helpful.

Please visit our current litters at “Banffy Haus Current Litters” to see some of our world class German shepherd litters.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Trying to get a stud or breeding female from a puppy? Bad idea.

Hello German shepherd puppies lovers:

 

I would like to write this article to people looking to buy a Germany shepherd puppy to breed.  I do not sell them to breed although I do give full ownership.  I believe all people have th right of full ownership for their dog.  I am not worried about people who would like to try one litter to retain the lines of their loved companion, to give one to friends or family.  I strongly recommend neutering/spaying at 12-18 months.

The ones to whom I would like to direct this blog is to those hoping to get a top notch breeding female or stud from a puppy.  This is unrealistic and impractical.  Certainly, a healthy female will 80% of the time be able to conceive.  But, in order to get a breeding female from a puppy, you take a great risk.  First, you can’t be certain the hips will be top notch.  For a pet, this is not critical.  But for a breeder this is.  Also, in order to maintain the qualitiy in the breed you will have to title her, which can cost $4,000-5,000.  And you can’t be certain she will have the drive or courage to complete her schutzhund title.  Also, buying a puppy, even from top bloodlines, does not guarantee show level conformation.  Next, the puppy you buy may turn out to be unable to conceive, may be a confrontational breeder, may have “white” heats which are difficult to time, may produce very small litters, poor progeny.  She may eat her pups, lactate inadequately, or be a poor mother.   In order to breed properly, you need to either do the hit and miss until you find a suitable breeder, or buy a proven, titled female, with a litter or two under her belt.  This can be very an expensive proposition.

Even more unreasonable is thinking you can get a top stud from a puppy.  This is also very risky.  He may not have enough libido to be a motivated breeder, his semen may have poor concentration or poor motility, produce terrible progeny.  And, as with the female, titling is very expensive.  It is just not reasonable.  And with top notch proven studs available with observable progeny for from $600-1000 a breeding, it just doesn’t make sense to take the risk.

I really don’t like to sell to anyone with the unrealistic hope to buy a puppy which will turn out to be a top notch breeder or world class female.  The probability is against it, and inevitably they are disatisfied customers.

Recommendation:  For all of you hobby breeders, my recommendation is never to buy a male for breeding.  Instead buy a female from good bloodlines and breed her for a stud fee to a top notch proven stud.  This will prove to be the most reasonable course of action according the most likely chance of success.  And you can sell the puppies for more money from a top stud, earning the stud fee back, without the risks and costs of trying to make your own top notch stud.

I hope this was helpful.

 

Please visit our current litters at “Banffy Haus Current Litters” to see some of our world class German shepherd litters.

 

 

 

Running with Your German Shepherd

Hello German shepherd puppies lovers:

I would like to just jot some thoughts down about running with your dog.  First of all never jog your German shepherd puppy.  Wait until they are at least one year old to begin any serious long distance running.  At this point the hip will have seated well into the socket, the growth plates will be set and the dog will have reached its maximum height.

But, please remember that you must matriculate your dog to running, a little at a time.  One reason is the tender pads of the feet.  These need to toughen up and callous over.  If you do not heed this advice and overdo the running too soon, you dog can get nasty cracks in the pads which can take a good deal of time to heal.  Of course it is best to run on grass as opposed to cement.  But if you will be running on a hard abrasive surface, build up the callous incrementally over time.

Also, it is best to build up their cardiovascular starting with 1/2 mile for a few days, then to one mile for a few days, etc.   Also, be very sensitive to your dog when running in heat as German shepherds can suffer heat prostration.  Make certain to have a bowl of cool clean water ready when they return.  If you are going on a long run on a hot day, bring water and  watch for signs of heat prostration.

As I know that a dog’s joints don’t last as long as a humans, I think that it is best to max out running at 5 miles a time and then drop your buddy home for a rest while you continue on. I know that dogs can run long distances with proper training and that people do run longer distances with their dogs.  But I worry about the constant trauma running on hard pavement.  We have well engineered shoes which cushion the shock.  Just my feeling.  Even we humans do get excessive and joint replacements are on the increase related to sometimes excessive exercise regimens.

Click on the link to read about the Banffy Method and how we develop our German shepherd puppies.