Amazing Stories of Banffy Haus German Shepherds

Hello German shepherd puppies lovers:

I have been thinking about writing a series on Banffy Haus stories, stories about Banffy Haus puppies or dogs we have imported for clients who have grown up and done some amazing things.   I will tell you one sad story about a family in Ohio.

This African American lady called me searching for the right German shepherd puppy for her deaf, dumb and blind son.  She wanted to get him a special companion to become his ears, eyes and voice to the world.  These incredible companions can become extensions of the body for sensory challenged individuals, becoming their only gate to the outside world.  They not only provide them with companionship, but classic German shepherd loyalty, protection and dedication.  I have sold dogs to become seizure alert dogs.  I have placed puppies with people with debilitating neuro-muscular diseases to act as motility support.  They are given special harnesses that allow fallen individuals to grab onto the leather harness handle and pull themselves up.

But this dog was to serve a very unique function and would have to learn multiple sensory support skills.  He would have to be extremely sensitive, very strong, and unusually intelligent.   Also, this dog would have to be an uncanny fit, and be completely dedicated to this sensory impaired individual.  Just imagine, the only senses this young boy had to communicate with the world was to touch, taste and smell.  Without a voice to express need or desire, or to alert for danger, this dog could give him the most amazing gift that we take completely for granted:  A sense of security.  Anyone who has studied Maslow’s hierarchy of human needs knows that individuals must first satisfy the need for security and safety prior to seeking satisfaction at other higher levels of need.  These dogs can facilitate a world of new possibilities.

Well, I placed the dog with them and remember that communication with the family stopped at some point.  One day, many years later, I received the call.  Someone had entered their back yard and somehow constrained the dog and stolen it.  Please understand that this is nothing like having a house broken into or a car stolen.  It was like she was mourning over the loss of her son’s eyes, ears and voice.  That is what they had stolen, not just a best friend, but this young man’s window to the world.

We at Banffy Haus German Shepherds honor these noble companions.  These beautiful black and red German shepherd puppies from parents imported from Germany are truly amazing beasts.

A Tribute to My Family and Clients of Banffy Haus German Shepherds

To all my Banffy Haus German Shepherd clients:

I have really enjoyed these years breeding black and red German shepherd puppies.  It has been a joy.  I have enjoyed waiting for every litter expectantly.  I am thankful for my family’s help, my daughter socializing the pups, helping to whelp them, cleaning, grooming and feeding, logging the pups and naming them. I thank my son who has been my builder, post hole digger, cleaner upper, whelper, feeder, and trainer.  Thank you to my wife for arranging all of the paperwork, shipping documents, driving with puppies to the airport, handling AKC registrations, clients.

You know I am a blessed man.  And I have truly enjoyed seeing what we produced as a result of our careful breeding, long drives to the stud, stressing over pedigrees, waiting expectantly for my females to arrive from Germany, hoping this one would produce super puppies with top temperament and great joints.  I’ve enjoyed the work.  It has not been a burden, especially with a great family to help me out.

It is not that I am done yet.  Certainly I have put many years in, but now I can reap the benefits of experience.  I will do it as long as I know it is God’s will.  I have enjoyed these noble beasts, intelligent, sometimes cocky, but with an inbred desire to serve.  They have always provided entertainment and companionship.

Now I am planning another litter with my SchH3 Ussa who is in heat, one in a long list of scores of litters and hundreds of puppies successfully placed with happy families.  We’ve made out mistakes over the years that we have learned from them.   And we have been able to produce a long line of awesome progeny which have brought great joy to many families, guided the blind and deaf, protected them from armed gunmen, foiled a thief armed with a knife and the list goes on.

But what really blesses us here at Banffy Haus is to have a past client come back to us for their next puppy.  Thank you so much for your loyalty and we will continue breeding black and red German shepherd puppies as long as we at Banffy Haus have great clients like you.

 

Banffy Haus: Feeding: Put Away the Trout Almondine

Hello Everyone From Banffy Haus German Shepherds:

We love our black and red German shepherd puppies.  But more is not necessarily better with puppies.  We tend to measure our deals by the pound. We want the biggest pup in the litter, get upset when a puppy is not growing into Clifford the dog, and brag about how large the paws are on our puppy.

We spoil them rotten and feed them anything so that they will keep growing, even though they have become so picky we have to continue to rotate their “menu” to make certain they are interested in their food.  We wet the food, heat the food, stress over whether they are getting enough probiotics or chondroitin/glucosamine.  We fret giving them tap water and instead use filtered water.   And of course, who would feed their dogs anything but vegan, kosher, halal, organic, free range, homogenized, bio-balanced, genetically scrubbed meat?

And, poor Helmut, our lovely male German shepherd puppy.  Yikes! We can see one of his ribs!  (See the pictures at Banffy Haus K-9 U)  And he just won’t eat!  Quick, get his trout/almondine/ epicure’s delight dog food and mix it in!  We need to fatten him up, quickly.  What if this stunts his growth?  Quick, rush, get the appetite enhancers!

Stop already.   Dogs will not starve themselves.  Set the food down for little Helmut, and if he doesn’t eat, take it up after 3 minutes.   So what.  He skips a meal.  But he will learn to gobble up the food placed before him quickly over time.  If a dog does starve itself, them certainly they are ill and need to take a trip to the vet.

Feeding simply is simply superior.  That’s three S’s in a row.   Alliteration to facilitate memorization.   Anyway, you and your dog will be much happier if they gratefully gobble up what you feed them and do so quickly.

And seeing the ribs is not a bad thing.  If you see no ribs, and they are hidden behind a bulbous layer of excess fat, it is time to, for their own health, lower the food intake.  It isn’t cute when our black and red German Shepherd puppies look like watermelons, and it is healthy for adults to look svelte and lean. Banffy Haus German Shepherds.

Banffy Haus: Black and Red German Shepherd Puppies

Hello from Banffy Haus to those on a search for black and red German shepherd puppies:

These days I at Banffy Haus German shepherds am consistently hearing clients asking for rich red and black hue on their German shepherd puppies.  I have written before on this issue but would like to address it once more.

Although pigment is important, this obsession with deep reds and black, and the economic pressure of demand risks forcing pigment to the top of the list of German shepherd characteristics in the breeding programs of German shepherd breeders.  This is not in itself bad unless it leads to a demotion of other critical characteristics such as phenotype, gender specific traits, temperament, working drive, or other breed standard requirements.  We don’t want this to color our breeding programs, as it were.

This is what happened with the American lines in which the gene pool was markedly damaged by over-emphasis of show characteristics even to the disintegration of the health of the breed with increased exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, degenerative spine issues, joint dysplasia etc.

What are we doing?  We had better beware if this overemphasis causes damage even to our breeding inventory of West German lines.  Are we so vain that we choose our dogs based largely on color?  The German shepherd is a working dog, a marvel of intelligence and ability, one of the top three most intelligent dogs in the world. Click on “Banffy Haus female shepherds” to see some of our prize 100% imported V rated, top hips and elbows, breeding stock.

They are a marvel to see jumping gracefully over the jumps and rounding the blinds at blinding speed.  I have witnessed what happens with overemphasis on outward appearances with the over-angulation.  I remember watching with horror as a shepherd attempted to jump, only to be constrained by their distorted rear quarters and clumsily tripped and fell, rolling over in ignominy. How sad.  Let’s hope that current fads don’t taint the breeding program and strategy of our breeders and that we remain dedicated to what this breed is all about, a balance of grace and power, of beauty and integrity, courage and loyalty, intelligence and a strongly built carriage.

Let’s be very careful that our focus on black and red German shepherd puppies doesn’t upset the genetic balance.

Banffy Haus German Shepherds: Help!: When to Wean Puppies?

Hello German shepherd breeders from Banffy Haus:

In this next article we will discuss some other issues regarding litters and German shepherd puppies

It is not always an easy thing to decide when to take mom out of the whelping area or decide when to stop her nursing.  There are a number of variables affecting that choice.

First of all, is mom enjoying her time with them or is she frustrated and getting a little aggressive.  Mom’s can start being frustrated when the pups start to get teeth or are very aggressive to nurse.  You will need to be vigilant that she doesn’t intentionally or unintentionally hurt the pups.  Some litters can develop and get teeth more quickly than others.  I take her out if I notice this behavior.

Secondly, if it is an unusually large litter and they are over 4-5 weeks and mom jumping in and out of the whelping box.  I get the pups used to softened food and then get her out.  I don’t want broken tails and damaged puppies.

Thirdly, is it time.  I feel you can start getting puppies used to softened food as early as three weeks.  But I like to get mom out as about 5-6 weeks of age.  Normally mom will decide this naturally.  However, this is good time to begin incremental weaning if she has not.

Be careful if you do decide to take her out.  If mom is still swollen with milk, be careful taking her out of the box and stopping nursing too precipitously.  I have done this and ended up having to milk mom and reduce food intake to relieve pressure and stop lactation and try to obviate mastitis.  Mastitis can be very painful for mom and can lead to infection. It is best to incrementally take mom out of the pen, let’s say for the daytime, and ten put her back for the night, and let the puppies drain her milk.  Then just do one feeding, and then finally as her milk begins to dry up, take her out permanently.

By the way, it is almost impossible to using a breast pump on mom.  And the milking syringes don’t work well.  You really have to massage from the back of the gland forward and squeeze to allow the milk to be released.

I hope this was useful to you.

Please visit our current litters at “Banffy Haus Current Litters” to see some of our world class German shepherd puppies for sale.

 

 

 

 

Banffy Haus German Shepherds: Mouthy Puppy II! Help!

Hello German shepherd puppies lovers from Banffy Haus:

In this article we discuss other issues regarding mouthiness in German shepherd pupies such as the proper way of redirecting and the damage caused by improper reaction to little sharp teeth clamping down on tender skin.  Also, I will discuss when one can expect it to tone down, if ever, and when the mouthiness is just too much and may be an indication of something else.

In this second article on “Mouthy Puppy: Help Part I” I will discuss:

1.  Redirection

2.  Improper reaction

3.  When the mouthiness will likely tone down

4.  When mouthiness is too much

Improper dealing with mouthiness can cause a dog to either lose their motivation to use their mouths, thereby constraining protection drive, or, in the extreme, lead to submissiveness.  So it is a good idea to do this right.  The first and best way to deal with more benign expressions is to redirect the mouthiness to an acceptable alternate object, such as a bone, toy, ice filled teething ring, etc.  I have had great luck with older dogs using kongs and antlers. With younger dogs the redirect is even more critical as they are less confident and more easily affected.

Improper redirection includes hitting the dog in the mouth, shoving your hand down their throat, clamping their teeth on their tongues, pinching their cheek on their teeth.  Mouthiness is natural I find these too direct and extreme for some dogs. And these methods can lead to loss of protective drive, or worse lead to submission or avoidance.

One other way to deal with it if you at a wits end is to do what mother does to correct a puppy.  Just grab the puppy by the scruff of the neck (the loose skin) and lift the front two paws off of the ground and shake saying “phooey” or another word reserved for correction.  And do this only for the specific circumstances where their behavior might harm themselves or someone or something which is quite vulnerable (children, expensive couches that you can’t move out of the way.

Normally this behavior begins to abate at about 9 months to 1.5 years old.  Also, you will have learned to manage it by then.  There are situations where mouthiness is really a misnomer for aggressiveness.  If the dog is constantly lunging and not just chewing, and, the behavior is accompanied by barking and other physical manifestations (hair up), guttural deep growling, this may be another issue.  This might be dominant aggressive behavior that must be dealt with before the dog grows up, and clearly and effectively.

I hope this was useful to you.

Please visit our website for tons of information at Banffy Haus K-9 University on German shepherd puppies and dogs.

 

 

 

 

 

Banffy Haus German Shepherd Puppies: Mouthiness! Help! Part I

We love our red and black german shepherd puppies:

This is the Banffy Haus staff.

Although I have written a little bit about how to handle in other places on the website, I think this issue is so important and can be so exasperating for my clients that I wish to address it here in detail.  I want you to have a good experience with your German shepherd puppy.  The first question one might ask is:  Is My Puppy Abnormal If It is Mouthy?  In the next article we will discuss some other issues regarding chewing such as the proper way of redirecting and the damage caused by improper reaction to little sharp teeth clamping down on tender skin.  Also, I will discuss when one can expect it to tone down, if ever, and when the mouthyness is just too much and may be an indication of something else.

First of all, almost every puppy will have a mouthy stage.   This is due to two things.  First, while they are teething (losing their babies and getting adult teeth) mouthing and gnawing releases some of the aggravating pain they have in their gums and bones of the mouth and can give as much pleasure as like scratching an itch.  There are many products which can help alleviate some of the problem, but it is just a stage they have to go through.

Secondly, puppies are learning to communicate with their mouth and use their mouth.  Dogs use their mouths for so much more than we do (at least in a mechanical fashion other than talking).  They pick up things and taste things, investigate objects and new textures, they indicate their approval or disapproval to other dogs with them, they jockey for pack position with them.  They also, as puppies, begin to practice the gleaning and chewing on bones of prey they might catch.   Also, chewing is instinctual and helps to keep good gum health and oral hygiene, cleaning the teeth.   Finally, as with little children, puppies need to be stimulated.   If they aren’t, this pent up youthful energy will likely be directed toward chewing.

So all of these things, teething, learning to communicate, taste, investigation, play and pack order, instinct to chew, glean and clean, boredom or release of excess energy we find in puppies.  So it is absolutely normal for puppies to be mouthy.  And this is especially true for German shepherd puppies, considering the genetic proximity to Canis Lupus (wolf).  But this can be VERY trying.  Don’t despair!  Read my next blog for more info.

I hope this was useful to you.

Please visit our current litters at “Banffy Haus Current Litters” to see some of our world class German shepherd litters.

 

 

Banffy Haus German Shepherds: Mourning the loss-Trying to Replace Your Dog

Hello lovers of black and red German shepherd puppies:

This Dr. Banffy of Banffy Haus.  This is such a tender subject, especially when it comes to our beloved German shepherds.  But it is important to deal with it, although compassionately.  Some people feel a sense of loss approaching that of human companion when they lose a dog of 10-15 years.  They have shared many special days and experiences.  They may have been with you through a difficult time.  They may have assuaged your loneliness or shared in a time success or joy such as the birth of a new child.

However, one must not let the mourning time distort ones vision.  First of all, at this time, you want nothing more than to have your dog back, the same dog you lost and not another. Some people get comfort out of going back to the same kennel, trying to find the same bloodlines, maybe the same parents.  Some look for the same eyes, coloration, size, something that looks like a reproduction of your deceased dog.

But this can be a mistake and lead to disappointment.  First of all your dog was unique.  You can never replace your dog, ever.  Be grateful that you enjoyed such the time you spent with them.  Secondly, going on a journey to replicate your dog’s DNA or try to get a clone can lead to disappointment.  Not only was your dog product of his/her DNA, but of environmental influences, the time in your life they were born, the place, the people in the house, your lifestyle at that time, etc.

It is best NOT to jump into a new dog if you are still at the stage of desiring to replicate your last dog. What a burden to place on your new puppy, a burden it should not have to bear.  And likely, as he/she is compared to your other dog, the new pup is pre-destined to failure.

If this is not the case, and you are moving with caution and care, and ready to create a new story from a blank slate with new German shepherd puppies, by all means, welcome a new German shepherd puppy into your home.

I hope this was helpful.

Please visit our current litters at “Banffy Haus Current Litters” to see some of our world class German shepherd litters.

 

 

 

 

 

German Shepherds from Banffy Haus: Should You Breed Your Dog Once to Keep a Pup?

Hello lovers of German shepherd puppies from Banffy Haus:

Of course we love our German Shepherds.  And  we would love to get another just like our current dog.  But should you breed your pet once to try to replicate your buddy?

I talk to a lot of people who say they would like to have full AKC registration and don’t want to get their dog neutered (male) or spayed (female) until they get a litter from them.  Their idea is that they love this dog so much that they would like to get a son or daughter of their dog to get a dog just like their beloved older dog.  The question is, does this make sense?  Other reasons include to save money or to give pups to relatives.

The short and frank answer is…no.

First of all, likely you have not had the dog’s hip stats done with either AKC or a foreign registry if you got it as a puppy.  It is somewhat irresponsible to breed a dog without knowing for certain that their joints are healthy.

Secondly, if it is a male, you can’t be certain that the male will have enough libido and mate well (get a good tie), have enough sperm concentration or motility.  Also, you don’t know what he will produce in terms of health, temperament, or good confirmation.  You have no history to go by.  Also, likely if you do mate an untitled dog the only person who would mate to yours is another person with an untitled dog.  This can be very risky. Thirdly, you probably are not going to be able to select a dog with compatible bloodlines (good line-breeding) because you won’t have much choice in females.  Also, the chances you will get a dog closely mirroring your current “best friend” is not probable.

If it is a female, then you can spend the money for a stud.  But, not everyone is willing to breed their beautiful titled stud to your untitled pet.  You also don’t know if your female will produce milk, be fertile, be a good mother (tend the pups and not harm them).  You will not be expert in timing the ovulation, and certainly could have trouble with whelping since you are likely very inexperienced.  You could easily lose pups if not all of the them and endanger the female’s life.  It could happen at night and necessitate emergency surgery that could cost a great deal of money.  Then there are the vet bills for puppy inoculations and health checks.

After it is all said and done, it would be better to just pay the price and get another puppy from a top breeding, with experienced breeder, with top lines, with a guarantee.  That new German shephed puppy will likely become another family legend and bring you equally as much joy as your last best friend.

I hope this was helpful.

Please visit our website for tons of information at Banffy Haus K-9 University on German shepherd puppies and dogs.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Should you buy a “monorchid” puppy?

Hello German shepherd puppies lovers:

The question is whether or not you should be concerned with buying a monorchid (one testicle down) male German Shepherd Puppy.

Well let’s consider the facts.  First of all, if you not a very experienced breeder who knows how to choose a potential top stud, and if you are not willing to put in the $4,000-5,000 for training, if you are not willing to shoulder the risk that the puppy may end up with bad hips, bad conformation may not have enough libido, or may be sterile, then you should not buy a puppy with the hope of getting stud or a top show dog.

Second of all, if you are buying the dog as a pet, it is irrelevant.  When buying as a pet one would want to neuter the dog when he gets to the relevant age anyway, at which point he will have neither scrotum. Having them removed has some clear advantages such as less or no sexual behavior, diminished marking and roaming, no chance of testicular cancer, less aggressive behavior, and less embarrassing displays of male body parts.

The neuter operation is a little more expensive when one testicle does not fall, but usually not exorbitantly.  And after the neuter there are absolutely no long-term effects to the dog of having been monorchid.  Nor was any significant risk when the dog was waiting to be neutered.

So should one buy a monorchid male puppy?  If you are buying a pet male, then this should be irrelevant to your decision.

I hope this was helpful.

Homepage at “Banffy Haus German shepherds” to take advantage of the rich information about black and red German shepherd puppies.