Helpful hints on breeding German Shepherds.

A Tribute to My Family and Clients of Banffy Haus German Shepherds

To all my Banffy Haus German Shepherd clients:

I have really enjoyed these years breeding black and red German shepherd puppies.  It has been a joy.  I have enjoyed waiting for every litter expectantly.  I am thankful for my family’s help, my daughter socializing the pups, helping to whelp them, cleaning, grooming and feeding, logging the pups and naming them. I thank my son who has been my builder, post hole digger, cleaner upper, whelper, feeder, and trainer.  Thank you to my wife for arranging all of the paperwork, shipping documents, driving with puppies to the airport, handling AKC registrations, clients.

You know I am a blessed man.  And I have truly enjoyed seeing what we produced as a result of our careful breeding, long drives to the stud, stressing over pedigrees, waiting expectantly for my females to arrive from Germany, hoping this one would produce super puppies with top temperament and great joints.  I’ve enjoyed the work.  It has not been a burden, especially with a great family to help me out.

It is not that I am done yet.  Certainly I have put many years in, but now I can reap the benefits of experience.  I will do it as long as I know it is God’s will.  I have enjoyed these noble beasts, intelligent, sometimes cocky, but with an inbred desire to serve.  They have always provided entertainment and companionship.

Now I am planning another litter with my SchH3 Ussa who is in heat, one in a long list of scores of litters and hundreds of puppies successfully placed with happy families.  We’ve made out mistakes over the years that we have learned from them.   And we have been able to produce a long line of awesome progeny which have brought great joy to many families, guided the blind and deaf, protected them from armed gunmen, foiled a thief armed with a knife and the list goes on.

But what really blesses us here at Banffy Haus is to have a past client come back to us for their next puppy.  Thank you so much for your loyalty and we will continue breeding black and red German shepherd puppies as long as we at Banffy Haus have great clients like you.

 

Banffy Haus: Black and Red German Shepherd Puppies

Hello from Banffy Haus to those on a search for black and red German shepherd puppies:

These days I at Banffy Haus German shepherds am consistently hearing clients asking for rich red and black hue on their German shepherd puppies.  I have written before on this issue but would like to address it once more.

Although pigment is important, this obsession with deep reds and black, and the economic pressure of demand risks forcing pigment to the top of the list of German shepherd characteristics in the breeding programs of German shepherd breeders.  This is not in itself bad unless it leads to a demotion of other critical characteristics such as phenotype, gender specific traits, temperament, working drive, or other breed standard requirements.  We don’t want this to color our breeding programs, as it were.

This is what happened with the American lines in which the gene pool was markedly damaged by over-emphasis of show characteristics even to the disintegration of the health of the breed with increased exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, degenerative spine issues, joint dysplasia etc.

What are we doing?  We had better beware if this overemphasis causes damage even to our breeding inventory of West German lines.  Are we so vain that we choose our dogs based largely on color?  The German shepherd is a working dog, a marvel of intelligence and ability, one of the top three most intelligent dogs in the world. Click on “Banffy Haus female shepherds” to see some of our prize 100% imported V rated, top hips and elbows, breeding stock.

They are a marvel to see jumping gracefully over the jumps and rounding the blinds at blinding speed.  I have witnessed what happens with overemphasis on outward appearances with the over-angulation.  I remember watching with horror as a shepherd attempted to jump, only to be constrained by their distorted rear quarters and clumsily tripped and fell, rolling over in ignominy. How sad.  Let’s hope that current fads don’t taint the breeding program and strategy of our breeders and that we remain dedicated to what this breed is all about, a balance of grace and power, of beauty and integrity, courage and loyalty, intelligence and a strongly built carriage.

Let’s be very careful that our focus on black and red German shepherd puppies doesn’t upset the genetic balance.

Banffy Haus German Shepherds: Help!: When to Wean Puppies?

Hello German shepherd breeders from Banffy Haus:

In this next article we will discuss some other issues regarding litters and German shepherd puppies

It is not always an easy thing to decide when to take mom out of the whelping area or decide when to stop her nursing.  There are a number of variables affecting that choice.

First of all, is mom enjoying her time with them or is she frustrated and getting a little aggressive.  Mom’s can start being frustrated when the pups start to get teeth or are very aggressive to nurse.  You will need to be vigilant that she doesn’t intentionally or unintentionally hurt the pups.  Some litters can develop and get teeth more quickly than others.  I take her out if I notice this behavior.

Secondly, if it is an unusually large litter and they are over 4-5 weeks and mom jumping in and out of the whelping box.  I get the pups used to softened food and then get her out.  I don’t want broken tails and damaged puppies.

Thirdly, is it time.  I feel you can start getting puppies used to softened food as early as three weeks.  But I like to get mom out as about 5-6 weeks of age.  Normally mom will decide this naturally.  However, this is good time to begin incremental weaning if she has not.

Be careful if you do decide to take her out.  If mom is still swollen with milk, be careful taking her out of the box and stopping nursing too precipitously.  I have done this and ended up having to milk mom and reduce food intake to relieve pressure and stop lactation and try to obviate mastitis.  Mastitis can be very painful for mom and can lead to infection. It is best to incrementally take mom out of the pen, let’s say for the daytime, and ten put her back for the night, and let the puppies drain her milk.  Then just do one feeding, and then finally as her milk begins to dry up, take her out permanently.

By the way, it is almost impossible to using a breast pump on mom.  And the milking syringes don’t work well.  You really have to massage from the back of the gland forward and squeeze to allow the milk to be released.

I hope this was useful to you.

Please visit our current litters at “Banffy Haus Current Litters” to see some of our world class German shepherd puppies for sale.

 

 

 

 

German Shepherds from Banffy Haus: Should You Breed Your Dog Once to Keep a Pup?

Hello lovers of German shepherd puppies from Banffy Haus:

Of course we love our German Shepherds.  And  we would love to get another just like our current dog.  But should you breed your pet once to try to replicate your buddy?

I talk to a lot of people who say they would like to have full AKC registration and don’t want to get their dog neutered (male) or spayed (female) until they get a litter from them.  Their idea is that they love this dog so much that they would like to get a son or daughter of their dog to get a dog just like their beloved older dog.  The question is, does this make sense?  Other reasons include to save money or to give pups to relatives.

The short and frank answer is…no.

First of all, likely you have not had the dog’s hip stats done with either AKC or a foreign registry if you got it as a puppy.  It is somewhat irresponsible to breed a dog without knowing for certain that their joints are healthy.

Secondly, if it is a male, you can’t be certain that the male will have enough libido and mate well (get a good tie), have enough sperm concentration or motility.  Also, you don’t know what he will produce in terms of health, temperament, or good confirmation.  You have no history to go by.  Also, likely if you do mate an untitled dog the only person who would mate to yours is another person with an untitled dog.  This can be very risky. Thirdly, you probably are not going to be able to select a dog with compatible bloodlines (good line-breeding) because you won’t have much choice in females.  Also, the chances you will get a dog closely mirroring your current “best friend” is not probable.

If it is a female, then you can spend the money for a stud.  But, not everyone is willing to breed their beautiful titled stud to your untitled pet.  You also don’t know if your female will produce milk, be fertile, be a good mother (tend the pups and not harm them).  You will not be expert in timing the ovulation, and certainly could have trouble with whelping since you are likely very inexperienced.  You could easily lose pups if not all of the them and endanger the female’s life.  It could happen at night and necessitate emergency surgery that could cost a great deal of money.  Then there are the vet bills for puppy inoculations and health checks.

After it is all said and done, it would be better to just pay the price and get another puppy from a top breeding, with experienced breeder, with top lines, with a guarantee.  That new German shephed puppy will likely become another family legend and bring you equally as much joy as your last best friend.

I hope this was helpful.

Please visit our website for tons of information at Banffy Haus K-9 University on German shepherd puppies and dogs.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Trying to get a stud or breeding female from a puppy? Bad idea.

Hello German shepherd puppies lovers:

 

I would like to write this article to people looking to buy a Germany shepherd puppy to breed.  I do not sell them to breed although I do give full ownership.  I believe all people have th right of full ownership for their dog.  I am not worried about people who would like to try one litter to retain the lines of their loved companion, to give one to friends or family.  I strongly recommend neutering/spaying at 12-18 months.

The ones to whom I would like to direct this blog is to those hoping to get a top notch breeding female or stud from a puppy.  This is unrealistic and impractical.  Certainly, a healthy female will 80% of the time be able to conceive.  But, in order to get a breeding female from a puppy, you take a great risk.  First, you can’t be certain the hips will be top notch.  For a pet, this is not critical.  But for a breeder this is.  Also, in order to maintain the qualitiy in the breed you will have to title her, which can cost $4,000-5,000.  And you can’t be certain she will have the drive or courage to complete her schutzhund title.  Also, buying a puppy, even from top bloodlines, does not guarantee show level conformation.  Next, the puppy you buy may turn out to be unable to conceive, may be a confrontational breeder, may have “white” heats which are difficult to time, may produce very small litters, poor progeny.  She may eat her pups, lactate inadequately, or be a poor mother.   In order to breed properly, you need to either do the hit and miss until you find a suitable breeder, or buy a proven, titled female, with a litter or two under her belt.  This can be very an expensive proposition.

Even more unreasonable is thinking you can get a top stud from a puppy.  This is also very risky.  He may not have enough libido to be a motivated breeder, his semen may have poor concentration or poor motility, produce terrible progeny.  And, as with the female, titling is very expensive.  It is just not reasonable.  And with top notch proven studs available with observable progeny for from $600-1000 a breeding, it just doesn’t make sense to take the risk.

I really don’t like to sell to anyone with the unrealistic hope to buy a puppy which will turn out to be a top notch breeder or world class female.  The probability is against it, and inevitably they are disatisfied customers.

Recommendation:  For all of you hobby breeders, my recommendation is never to buy a male for breeding.  Instead buy a female from good bloodlines and breed her for a stud fee to a top notch proven stud.  This will prove to be the most reasonable course of action according the most likely chance of success.  And you can sell the puppies for more money from a top stud, earning the stud fee back, without the risks and costs of trying to make your own top notch stud.

I hope this was helpful.

 

Please visit our current litters at “Banffy Haus Current Litters” to see some of our world class German shepherd litters.

 

 

 

What to look for in a German Shepherd Puppy

Hello German shepherd puppies lovers:

It is interesting how I can get a call saying that a client wants a big male, one with some dominance and lots of drive to do schutzhund and they have 3 younger children and they want the dog to be great with people and other animals.  After talking to them they decide on a female German shepherd puppy.

I have already written another blog on male Vs. female so I won’t repeat that here.  But the question still remains, what do you look for in a GSD puppy.  Well, if you are buying a German shepherd, likely you either just think want one or you know what you want and you respect the breed for it typical characteristics.

I know all of us guys want the biggest toughest dog in the world bar none.  But, if you look for extremes you may get just that, a dog which is too extreme and unliveable and then you wish you had never seen the little ball of energy. I recommend you look for a balanced puppy.  It should be up around the mid to top of the standard, but not way over.  He/she should have good pigment, but not to the exclusion of other traits.  You want a dog which is confident yet not dominant.  What you want is a BALANCED DOG, one in which the GSD typical traits expressed.  The dog should have energy and confidence but not dominance or nervousness.  Look for good pigment but, as importantly, good structure.  You want some retrieve and prey drive, but one who is also content sitting by your side.

I hope this is a help to you.  Visit our German Shepherd K9 University by clicking on “GSD K9 U“.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Do You Have to Lose Money Breeding Dogs?

Hello German shepherd dog and puppies lovers:

I am just so tired of reading that people shouldn’t and can’t make a decent living breeding dogs. There is room making money in llamas, horses, fish farming, alpacas, worms, pigs, etc. It is biblical even. Abraham, Lot, Moses, Israel, Job for example were in the business of animal husbandry and were very successful at it. In Germany there is a proud and honorable tradition in breeding dogs that has been passed down from generation to generation. They pass down this craft to their children, and are painstakingly rigorous and intently perfectionist. We wouldn’t have our GSD breed if not for the work started with Max von Stephanitz and carried on for generations, proving and improving the breed, culling the gene pool. We are the beneficiaries of their efforts.

I am so tired of hearing that you are either of two types of breeders, those who are broke and do it for the breed, or those who make profit and have a puppy mill. We at Banffy Haus have only 5-7 litters per year, feed our dogs Royal Canin, get them the best vet care, have a heated nursery, wonderful runs with the best kennels from L-Bar-M Ranch products. We play music and sound effects for the pups, know them by name, are intent on reducing genetic diseases, assiduous about the blood lines we breed, serious about joint health, look to honor the breed standard and strive to retain working drives. We are vigilant about cleanliness with our own dog septic, puppies sheets which cost a bit more to disgard after one use, fresh cedar chips and fresh smelling kennels kept fresh smelling and constantly sprayed off. We want to be craftsman, proud of our work, and proud of our progeny. But we can still make a profit and shouldn’t be embarrassed. It is natural.  We were careful in what we spent on our micro-kennels to keep costs at an acceptable level, trying to create a paradigm for other small hobby breeders so that they can do things right and still be able to afford it and earn a return.

The trick is to start with the right motivation and then apply the right skills. I read a blog today where someone asked what breed they should do to breed for profit. Just click here to see the exchange. This was the wrong motivation. We start with a love for dogs, in fact a specific love for a specific breed and a desire to provide top quality companions for families.  This respect and enjoyment will show in how we set up our kennels and the way we treat our dogs. Deciding upon a breed in order to maximize profit is the wrong motivation. I was an athlete and a coach, having also spent five years in military school. I was brought up loving animals. There was something about shepherds that fit for me, something about these brilliant, courageous athletes that I really respected.  I started with shepherds and have only bred shepherds. I focused even more specifically on West German show lines. This is my breed, my focus, my craft. In the next blog post I will discuss the right skills and how they are brought to bear to enable a true craft breeder to make a decent profit while improving the breed and running a very nice micro-kennel operation. There are not just two rubrics for German Shepherd breeders.  Not only are there those who are puppy mills or those who basically do it for the breed and break even or go broke. There are also those who are true proud craftsman and balance their craft with running an operation that can also allow them to continue breeding wonderful representations of this marvelous breed and support themselves in the process.

Every litter for me is an exciting event.  I still love the smell of German Shepherd puppies.  I still love working with these magnificent animals.  If you get a chance, you can also visit our K-9U on the home page for more useful articles and short helpful, free of charge, educational videos on the breed.  Just click here.  Also you can visit our kennel design page which we are incrementally building and will include a video catalog for building your own micro kennel.

German Shepherd Breeders Beware: EPI

Hello German shepherd puppy and German shepherd dog lovers:

Exocrine Pancreatic Insufficiency in German shepherd dogs. Symptoms include:
1.Foul smelling feces
2.Yellow of mustard color feces
3.Consistency soft unformed like a cow patty, oily
4.Brittle coat, loss of hair
5.Weight loss. Inability to keep weight on even with appetite
6.Voracious appetite
7.Constant thirst
8.Rumbling sounds in the stomach and gas

EPI is a common disease in the German shepherd dog. I myself have been fortunate to only have one myself. Also I have only had one reported in hundreds of pups I have sold over the last decade. But 70% of reported cases of EPI are in German Shepherd dogs. It does not normally present itself in German shepherd puppies. Sometimes it takes time for the pancreas to atrophy (die) prior to the dog becoming symptomatic. It usually appears in young dogs ages 4-5.

This disease is basically caused by the malfunctioning (or lack thereof) of the pancreas. The pancreas either incrementally fails to excrete enough enzymes to digest food or completely shuts done, preventing the proper digestion and absorption of nutrients. Basically, due to the failure of the pancreas to produce the enzymes necessary to digest the food, the dog starves, even if they eat lots of food. The pancreas does not produce the proper amounts of amylase (to digest starches and sugars), lipases (for fats), and proteases (for proteins). The dog literally can starve to death.

There are thought to be two major causes of EPI. One is pancreatic atrophy, which may be due to an inherited condition. The second could be stress to the pancreas caused by multiple bouts of pancreatitis. There is no cure for pancreatitis and life long treatment are expensive, using pancreatic enzyme supplements.

We at Banffy Haus have been very fortunate in this regard.  We have had a very low reported incidence of EPI in the German Sheperd puppies we have sold.  If you are interested we have German shepherd puppies for sale listed on our page:  Current litters (just click to visit).

INTERESTING NOTE: I have heard of a nurse friend of mine who treated EPI in her German shepherd dog with sheep pancreas for a much lower cost than the supplements. I am not certain how she did this but it may be something to look into.

Puppy Development for German Shepherd Breeders

 

Hello GSD lovers

Puppy Development Techniques:  Please look online on youtube at our new German Shepherd puppy video on helpful techniques for puppy development for Geman shepherd breeders.  In it we show some of what we do here at Banffy Haus to prepare your puppy.

Please take a look at it on our growing instructional video webpage. (click here).

Giving puppies a head start is so vital.  Make certain your breeder is not so big or so commercial that they don’t take the time to nurture and individually treat each puppy in a litter.  Since we normally only have one litter at a time, we can know each puppy individually.  We can know them by name.

We will be sharing more and more about this issue, and will reveal things as we learn through our experimentation with our puppies.

My goal is to make your life with your German shepherd puppies as enjoyable as possible.

 

 

 

 

 

 

German Shepherd puppies owners CAUTION-HIPS

 

Hello German Shepherd puppies lovers:

This is Dr. Banfe.  In this blog post I would like to help you with one of the most ubiquitous concerns for German Shepherd breeders and owners, hip health.  First of all, according to the OFA, hip dysplasia for dogs breeds range from 72% for the bulldog to 0% for the Italian greyhound.  In the US the German Shepherd used to be a poster child for dysplasia.  But recognition of the problem has led to a marked decrease in this problem in the breed.  Currently the German Shepherd is at 19% (number 40 of all breeds listed).  This means that your German Shepherd puppy in the US has a 19% chance of having bad hips.

Good news is that the Germans, with their rigorous systemic approach have reduced hip dysplasia to less than 10% – I have heard as low as 7%.  So getting German lines will dramatically reduce the incidence of hip dysplasia in your German shepherd.  You see, the Americans do not require dogs which are bred to have had hip xrays and certifications.  The AKC does not keep any records of a dog’s health.  However the SV in Germany requires hip certifications and accurate records are kept in order to sanitize the gene pool of this crippling condition.  And, they have a central orthopedic clearinghouse for just German Shepherd hip xrays, a specific group which has the responsibility for supervising the review of hip xrays and certifications.  Whereas, from what I understand, the OFA handles all breeds and rotates xrays out to any orthopedic veterinary expert who is currently working within the OFA system around the country.  So the German system leads to more consistency.

Years ago the Germans also instituted the ZW system on top of the HD and ED (elbow) system.  This statistic reflects the probability of that a dog will pass hip dysplasia on to its progeny.  Although in Germany  I have heard reports of cheating to improve these stats for a specific dog, such as not reporting puppies which had the condition, overall the rigorous German approach to hip dysplasia has been quite effective.  A good rating would be less than 100.  But for certain the sum total of a pairing should not equal more than 200.  For example, my new female Ussa vom Suentelstein has a ZW of 80 and my Parla vom Fiemereck has a ZW of 74.  So they have low probability of passing bad joints to their progeny.  They could be matched with a male of over 100, although we never would.

You can visit our k-9 university for more useful articles by clicking K9 U.

In the next blog post, I will discuss your German shepherds puppies’ hips, some do’s and don’ts and some timing issues regarding formation of the hips.