Coverage of many other issues such as working vs. show lines, long coats vs. stock hair, etc.

Banffy Haus Secrets

Hello German Shepherd Puppies lovers:

I wrote this short helpful top 7 list for you, our Banffy Haus clients and other German shepherd puppies lovers regarding dog behavior.  I hope it is helpful.   Here are the first three.  The next blog will have the last four.  Please note that these are general rules and one must understand ones own dog to properly determine levels of reward and punishment, duration of training as well as the proper rewards and punishments for your specific dog.

The Seven Simple R’s for Dog Behavioral Integration

R’S FOR A HAPPY HOME

By Dr. Peter Banfe

  1.  Rules:  Dogs thrive on simple understandable social structure and articulated rules.  Set up rules for the dog and enforce them.  Set these with the family (not on the couch, no rough-housing inside, certain rooms off limit) and enforce them and your dog and you will have a happier dog and family. Example:  Feeding at the table is improper.  It will motivate salivation and begging.  Certain dominance behaviors should be shunned.  For example, excessive licking and jumping up, surging ahead when walking all can be dominance behaviors.
  2. Repetition:  Repeat every day the behavioral rules a number of times.  Dogs learn by repetition. A good time is before a meal, or during a walk.  It is better to focus on one behavior (sitting) multiple times in a session than a number of behaviors once in a session.  And it is a good thing, if you have laid off the training for a while, to refresh the obedience relationship by repeated the repetition ritual.  Always focus one behavior and repeat it many times in a session.  Demand perfection and excellence.  If she is not sitting completely, she is not obeying.  Do it over and over.  And after it is correct once, repeat and repeat.
  3. Reward: Dogs are best rewarded not with human style affection (kisses and hugs),  but with your time and company.  It is a privilege to spend time with the Alpha.  Of course, you can use food or toys, a praise.   But reward must be connected to obedience.  Give nothing for nothing.  It is so important to distinguish between negative and positive reinforcement.  When praising exaggerate profusely.  Use higher pitched vocal tone to simulate excitement.  Also use body language to convey your satisfaction.

I hope these are helpful hints for understanding the behavior of your Banffy Haus German Shepherd puppies.  If you want to read more visit our blog and K9 university.

The Automatic Dog Training Technique by Banffy Haus

Hello German Shepherd puppies lovers:

I hope all of you will have a very blessed Christmas.  For those wondering, yes we do have ONE big male import German shepherd puppy for sale from Germany that can be delivered prior to Christmas.  CLICK HERE!

But now…on the automatic dog training technique.  This is a follow-up to the last article I wrote entitled “You are always training with your German shepherd”.  I know we would all like to know a way to ensure your puppy becomes all that it can be and become another legend in the family, your own Rin Tin Tin.

Well, here is the secret:  The environment.  Environment is one of the most important variables determining the success of a human child.  A nurturing, loving environment, one with encouragement and many avenues for learning and creativity improve the chances of a child’s success later in life.  While a broken and angry household, in which parents abandon children to their own devices, and let them learn and fend for themselves, normally contributes to a greater probability of truancy and delinquency.

Dogs are very routine animals.   I remember how at first when my parents drove me to military academy I resented it.  But the structure and routine was excellent for me and I flourished. There were loving, yet demanding, men and women who corrected me for mistakes but encouraged my successes.  Dogs, even more than humans, yearn for and thrive on order, routine and a firm social order.  They are just more confident and peaceful in such a structure.

So, of course you would want your dog to have every chance for success and to be a valued member of your pack.  But how do you do this.  I recommend you make an “K-9 Home Environmental plan” for Fritz.  Type it out.  Read it to the family and stick by it.  Don’t flinch and don’t move an inch.

It should include, for example, which rooms Fritz is allowed to come in, things he can and can’t play with, or lay on.  Be specific.  Do not ever let him have the same rights as the humans.  Yes, that means not on the couch.  That is reserved for you, with him loyally at your feet.  No, not in the kitchen during dinner.  That is your time.  Also, never let your huge, powerful, brilliant shepherd sleep in bed with you.  If you decide he is not to go upstairs, enforce it.  Choose potty areas and egress and ingress for your dog.  Give him his spot where he is to lay, rather than him choosing it.  Choose his eating place, which is best in a garage and not within the walls of the house.  Be specific and detailted.   Map this out, make a diagram, learn it, teach it to the family and, most of all, enforce it.

I will finish the discussion of the “K-9 Home Environmental plan” for your German shepherd puppy or dog in the next article.  I hope it has piqued your curiosity.

I hope these are helpful hints for understanding the behavior of your Banffy Haus German Shepherd puppies.  If you want to visit and K9 university or visit our puppies for sale page.

You Are Always in Training with your German Shepherd

Hello German Shepherd puppies lovers:

My father used to tell me that military academy was good for me because the structure would keep me out of trouble.  Indeed it did and it was good for me.  I developed patterns of behavior, respect and cleanliness, integrity and discipline, which have helped me during all of my life.

This is the same for your German shepherd.  You need to create a consistent and well thought out ordered living structure for your shepherd.  And you need to stick with it without relenting and breaking the structure. You may think that your dog has been so good, or is so darling that just this once you will feed him/her at the table while you are eating.  But this relenting just makes you happy and is not in the best interests of the dog.

We all marvel at superbly trained German shepherds, police or military trained.  Most of us would like a dog like that.  In fact I will tell you that those noble beasts are at peace, knowing exactly what to do and when to do it.  They are creatures of structure, and very comfortable within it.

So, it is kind for us to create structure.  Dogs are creatures of habit and order.  And we love it when they are obedient and loyal.  We need to create environments of structure for them so that they can become the dogs they could be and that we would prefer.

So, when you get the urge to break ranks and to encourage your dog to do so, don’t be surprised or angry at them when they continue the behavior you began.  Don’t blame them if they jump up on your mother and ruin her new dress when yesterday you decided to pat your chest and encourage them to jump up.  Don’t get angry at them if you have friends over and they salivate and beg for food when just last week you rewarded Otto with a big piece of meat at dinner.

In the next article I will carefully detail how to create a surefire structure to get the most out of your amazing German shepherd and raise your German shepherd puppies in an environment that helps them to be all they can be.

I hope these are helpful hints for understanding the behavior of your Banffy Haus German Shepherd puppies.  If you want to visit and K9 university or visit our puppies for sale page.

Amazing Stories of Banffy Haus German Shepherds

Hello German shepherd puppies lovers:

I have been thinking about writing a series on Banffy Haus stories, stories about Banffy Haus puppies or dogs we have imported for clients who have grown up and done some amazing things.   I will tell you one sad story about a family in Ohio.

This African American lady called me searching for the right German shepherd puppy for her deaf, dumb and blind son.  She wanted to get him a special companion to become his ears, eyes and voice to the world.  These incredible companions can become extensions of the body for sensory challenged individuals, becoming their only gate to the outside world.  They not only provide them with companionship, but classic German shepherd loyalty, protection and dedication.  I have sold dogs to become seizure alert dogs.  I have placed puppies with people with debilitating neuro-muscular diseases to act as motility support.  They are given special harnesses that allow fallen individuals to grab onto the leather harness handle and pull themselves up.

But this dog was to serve a very unique function and would have to learn multiple sensory support skills.  He would have to be extremely sensitive, very strong, and unusually intelligent.   Also, this dog would have to be an uncanny fit, and be completely dedicated to this sensory impaired individual.  Just imagine, the only senses this young boy had to communicate with the world was to touch, taste and smell.  Without a voice to express need or desire, or to alert for danger, this dog could give him the most amazing gift that we take completely for granted:  A sense of security.  Anyone who has studied Maslow’s hierarchy of human needs knows that individuals must first satisfy the need for security and safety prior to seeking satisfaction at other higher levels of need.  These dogs can facilitate a world of new possibilities.

Well, I placed the dog with them and remember that communication with the family stopped at some point.  One day, many years later, I received the call.  Someone had entered their back yard and somehow constrained the dog and stolen it.  Please understand that this is nothing like having a house broken into or a car stolen.  It was like she was mourning over the loss of her son’s eyes, ears and voice.  That is what they had stolen, not just a best friend, but this young man’s window to the world.

We at Banffy Haus German Shepherds honor these noble companions.  These beautiful black and red German shepherd puppies from parents imported from Germany are truly amazing beasts.

A Tribute to My Family and Clients of Banffy Haus German Shepherds

To all my Banffy Haus German Shepherd clients:

I have really enjoyed these years breeding black and red German shepherd puppies.  It has been a joy.  I have enjoyed waiting for every litter expectantly.  I am thankful for my family’s help, my daughter socializing the pups, helping to whelp them, cleaning, grooming and feeding, logging the pups and naming them. I thank my son who has been my builder, post hole digger, cleaner upper, whelper, feeder, and trainer.  Thank you to my wife for arranging all of the paperwork, shipping documents, driving with puppies to the airport, handling AKC registrations, clients.

You know I am a blessed man.  And I have truly enjoyed seeing what we produced as a result of our careful breeding, long drives to the stud, stressing over pedigrees, waiting expectantly for my females to arrive from Germany, hoping this one would produce super puppies with top temperament and great joints.  I’ve enjoyed the work.  It has not been a burden, especially with a great family to help me out.

It is not that I am done yet.  Certainly I have put many years in, but now I can reap the benefits of experience.  I will do it as long as I know it is God’s will.  I have enjoyed these noble beasts, intelligent, sometimes cocky, but with an inbred desire to serve.  They have always provided entertainment and companionship.

Now I am planning another litter with my SchH3 Ussa who is in heat, one in a long list of scores of litters and hundreds of puppies successfully placed with happy families.  We’ve made out mistakes over the years that we have learned from them.   And we have been able to produce a long line of awesome progeny which have brought great joy to many families, guided the blind and deaf, protected them from armed gunmen, foiled a thief armed with a knife and the list goes on.

But what really blesses us here at Banffy Haus is to have a past client come back to us for their next puppy.  Thank you so much for your loyalty and we will continue breeding black and red German shepherd puppies as long as we at Banffy Haus have great clients like you.

 

Banffy Haus German Shepherds: Mourning the loss-Trying to Replace Your Dog

Hello lovers of black and red German shepherd puppies:

This Dr. Banffy of Banffy Haus.  This is such a tender subject, especially when it comes to our beloved German shepherds.  But it is important to deal with it, although compassionately.  Some people feel a sense of loss approaching that of human companion when they lose a dog of 10-15 years.  They have shared many special days and experiences.  They may have been with you through a difficult time.  They may have assuaged your loneliness or shared in a time success or joy such as the birth of a new child.

However, one must not let the mourning time distort ones vision.  First of all, at this time, you want nothing more than to have your dog back, the same dog you lost and not another. Some people get comfort out of going back to the same kennel, trying to find the same bloodlines, maybe the same parents.  Some look for the same eyes, coloration, size, something that looks like a reproduction of your deceased dog.

But this can be a mistake and lead to disappointment.  First of all your dog was unique.  You can never replace your dog, ever.  Be grateful that you enjoyed such the time you spent with them.  Secondly, going on a journey to replicate your dog’s DNA or try to get a clone can lead to disappointment.  Not only was your dog product of his/her DNA, but of environmental influences, the time in your life they were born, the place, the people in the house, your lifestyle at that time, etc.

It is best NOT to jump into a new dog if you are still at the stage of desiring to replicate your last dog. What a burden to place on your new puppy, a burden it should not have to bear.  And likely, as he/she is compared to your other dog, the new pup is pre-destined to failure.

If this is not the case, and you are moving with caution and care, and ready to create a new story from a blank slate with new German shepherd puppies, by all means, welcome a new German shepherd puppy into your home.

I hope this was helpful.

Please visit our current litters at “Banffy Haus Current Litters” to see some of our world class German shepherd litters.

 

 

 

 

 

German Shepherds from Banffy Haus: Should You Breed Your Dog Once to Keep a Pup?

Hello lovers of German shepherd puppies from Banffy Haus:

Of course we love our German Shepherds.  And  we would love to get another just like our current dog.  But should you breed your pet once to try to replicate your buddy?

I talk to a lot of people who say they would like to have full AKC registration and don’t want to get their dog neutered (male) or spayed (female) until they get a litter from them.  Their idea is that they love this dog so much that they would like to get a son or daughter of their dog to get a dog just like their beloved older dog.  The question is, does this make sense?  Other reasons include to save money or to give pups to relatives.

The short and frank answer is…no.

First of all, likely you have not had the dog’s hip stats done with either AKC or a foreign registry if you got it as a puppy.  It is somewhat irresponsible to breed a dog without knowing for certain that their joints are healthy.

Secondly, if it is a male, you can’t be certain that the male will have enough libido and mate well (get a good tie), have enough sperm concentration or motility.  Also, you don’t know what he will produce in terms of health, temperament, or good confirmation.  You have no history to go by.  Also, likely if you do mate an untitled dog the only person who would mate to yours is another person with an untitled dog.  This can be very risky. Thirdly, you probably are not going to be able to select a dog with compatible bloodlines (good line-breeding) because you won’t have much choice in females.  Also, the chances you will get a dog closely mirroring your current “best friend” is not probable.

If it is a female, then you can spend the money for a stud.  But, not everyone is willing to breed their beautiful titled stud to your untitled pet.  You also don’t know if your female will produce milk, be fertile, be a good mother (tend the pups and not harm them).  You will not be expert in timing the ovulation, and certainly could have trouble with whelping since you are likely very inexperienced.  You could easily lose pups if not all of the them and endanger the female’s life.  It could happen at night and necessitate emergency surgery that could cost a great deal of money.  Then there are the vet bills for puppy inoculations and health checks.

After it is all said and done, it would be better to just pay the price and get another puppy from a top breeding, with experienced breeder, with top lines, with a guarantee.  That new German shephed puppy will likely become another family legend and bring you equally as much joy as your last best friend.

I hope this was helpful.

Please visit our website for tons of information at Banffy Haus K-9 University on German shepherd puppies and dogs.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Should you buy a “monorchid” puppy?

Hello German shepherd puppies lovers:

The question is whether or not you should be concerned with buying a monorchid (one testicle down) male German Shepherd Puppy.

Well let’s consider the facts.  First of all, if you not a very experienced breeder who knows how to choose a potential top stud, and if you are not willing to put in the $4,000-5,000 for training, if you are not willing to shoulder the risk that the puppy may end up with bad hips, bad conformation may not have enough libido, or may be sterile, then you should not buy a puppy with the hope of getting stud or a top show dog.

Second of all, if you are buying the dog as a pet, it is irrelevant.  When buying as a pet one would want to neuter the dog when he gets to the relevant age anyway, at which point he will have neither scrotum. Having them removed has some clear advantages such as less or no sexual behavior, diminished marking and roaming, no chance of testicular cancer, less aggressive behavior, and less embarrassing displays of male body parts.

The neuter operation is a little more expensive when one testicle does not fall, but usually not exorbitantly.  And after the neuter there are absolutely no long-term effects to the dog of having been monorchid.  Nor was any significant risk when the dog was waiting to be neutered.

So should one buy a monorchid male puppy?  If you are buying a pet male, then this should be irrelevant to your decision.

I hope this was helpful.

Homepage at “Banffy Haus German shepherds” to take advantage of the rich information about black and red German shepherd puppies.

 

 

 

Rules on Multiple Dog Houses: Gender? Age?

Hello German shepherd puppies lovers:

One of the most heart-rendering reports I received from a client was about a German shepherd puppy I sold to them.  From what I understand, they had two adult shepherds and a very young puppy (10 weeks or so) and went away from the house.  Somehow the containment area between the adults had been breached and the puppy got in with the adults.  They called me, understandably distraught, and told me they had found the puppy with its neck broken in the adult area of the kennels.  These were good people, responsible people, but somehow a mistake was made.

A second client called me and was beside herself because the adult female she had imported fought everyday with her male, and that much blood had been shed.  She herself could be severely injured in the process of breaking up one of these fights. Supposedly she had followed the rules before making the decision, male with female if adult.  She just couldn’t understand what had happened.

I would like to do a couple of blogs on this issue.  What are the simple basic guidelines for mixing genders and age?  What is the proper age and gender to bring a dog into an already existing pack ?  How do you decrease the problems and how can you determine if there may be a problem?

In this blog I will give you just a couple of basic, general rules for mixing genders and age.  But remember, current pack dynamics, individual dog temperaments, must be analyzed in addition to these simple guidelines.  But here they are.

Probably the ideal is to begin with puppies that are opposite genders, brought in together into a family.  This way they will grow up together, set pack order normally quite well through ritualistic, non-injurious pack order confirmation.  Next, probably would be a puppy (male best, female second) with an adult female, especially if they have been bred or if it is the mother.  This way the maternal instinct with be strong.  Next is probably an older mature male with a female puppy.   Following this might be an adult female with an adult male.  Next, and starting to get into an area that raises potential red flags, would be two male puppies brought up together.  Now we move into the pairing which are clearly risky.  This would include two females or two males.

I will discuss more in the next article.  And clearly there are other variables which can be even more determinate, such as temperament, and expertise of the owner to read the signs and properly socialize them together safely, or how much time they have to spend supervising them when they are together.

I hope this was helpful.

Please visit our current litters at “Banffy Haus Current Litters” to see some of our world class German shepherd litters.

 

 

DANGER: GERMAN SHEPHERD AT RISK!

Hello German shepherd puppies lovers:

I just feel drawn to list a number of very irresponsible things some people do with their German shepherd puppies and older dogs.  I hope the list just might caution someone against doing something they may have done had they not read it.  I think I will make it a list so that it can stand out:

1.  Don’t overfeed your dogs:  No, it is not cute that Klaus is grossly overweight.  Shepherds have a breed standard.  Unless you have an unusually large dog, the standard is a good guide.   American buy dogs by the pound and believe bigger is better.  Also, for some reason we fear underfeeding our dog.   We are an obese culture and our animal reflect our own obesity, as we feed them into oblivion.  With a shepherd, lean is good and how they should be.  It is alright to see some ribs.  They are not dying.  If they have energy, do not excessively shed, don’t have a strange odor, don’t have overly flaky skin, and are just lean, that is good.  Their hips joints are finite in terms of use, and overweight reduces the longevity of joints.

Sorry I took so long on overfeeding.  But there are just so many other related health concerns regarding obese dogs.  You can look at a picture bird’s-eye view of a representative healthy weight and overweight at our K-9 college at “GSD K9 U“.

2.  Don’t leave dogs with things near them they can injest:  Like tennis balls.  By the way, the glue on normal tennis balls erodes the enamel on dogs’ teeth.  When they have bitten a bone in pieces, take it away right away.   My dog destroyed a kong and then vomited up the pieces.  I should have been watching.  I know a dog who swallowed a tennis ball whole.  Watch out for those plastic packing peanuts.  They are toxic.  Antifreeze is sweet but deadly.

3.  Don’t leave your dog tied to a tree or post with a choker on the live link:  They can easily wrap themselves around the post and strangle themselves.

4.  Dont feed only one big meal a day:  Although I have read that bloat (too much air and fluid in the stomach) can be caused by other things (older age, stress, acidic foods), one cause attributed to bloat is eating one large dry dog food meal a day.  Instead give your dog two medium sized meals.

5.  Don’t use the “knee” correction for jumping up: Some people, and I have also, use the knee correction for dogs which jump up.  They just throw their knee into the dogs chest as they jump up.   But this can lead to broken bones, and painful bruises.  Better is to “block” the nose, cupping your hands and letting them run into it.  Or have someone hold their leash and yank back as the jump up.

 

I will give you some more on another blog.  But those are just a couple of things to think about.

 

I hope this is a help to you.  Visit our current and planned world class German Shepherd litters by clicking on “current litters“.